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Newt Fencing in Bristol

Do you need a quote for great crested newt fencing?

Different options for newt fencing are clearly explained in this short video.

 

JPR Environmental has installed 1000s of metres of newt fencing and slow worm fencing in and around Gloucestershire and the rest of the UK.

Newt fencing is installed in order to isolate sites for surveying and development. 

We have more than 15 years’ experience with temporary, semi-permanent and permanent fencing.

Call us on 01453 708804 or email us if you need a quote to install newt fencing
 
Do you need to fulfill planning conditions before you can start your development?

Our newt fencing services cover all stages of habitat isolation projects.  First of all, we can mark out the fenceline in addition to installing the newt fencing and newt traps.  Furthermore, we will undertake ongoing newt fence maintenance and finally, we will undertake the removal of newt fencing.

We install newt fencing to isolate either large or small sites in addition to those with restricted access.

Are you an ecologist or developer who needs to install newt fencing?

Our staff are qualified and experienced so we have been instructed by both ecologists and developers to deal with protected species mitigation work.  We can work with an ecological clerk of works or our staff can be trusted on site to deal with any protected species issues that may arise.

Do you want a quote for or advice on newt or slow worm exclusion fencing?  For advice or a quote, please Contact us.

We principally employ a compact trencher on newt fence installations. As a result, this minimises the potential impact on resident great crested newt and slow worm populations.  While we use a mini digger on sites with rougher ground when appropriate, we can also dig lengths manually where there is a particular sensitivity.

 
Types of Newt Fencing

JPR Environmental offers the full range of fencing specifications from temporary sheet and post to semi-permanent 1mm plastic panels and sheet and permanent HDPE planels.  We can supply and install all brands of amphibian and reptile fencing according to our clients’ requirements. We can also supply and install a lifetime guaranteed, galvanised steel system.

We regularly monitor our competitors’ prices and can say with confidence that we are highly competitive when quoting for projects in the UK.

Unlike some fencing suppliers who also install, we are not tied to a specific system and can therefore offer the best solution at the most reasonable cost.

If you would like to read more about newt fencing, go to our What is Newt Fencing page.

Go to our protected species page for more information on great crested newts and slow worms.

See below for links to our most recent projects.

“Call us on 01453 708804 or email us with your protected species enquiry”

About Bristol

Bristol is a city straddling the River Avon in the southwest of England with a prosperous maritime history. Its former city-centre port is now a cultural hub, the Harbourside, where the M Shed museum explores local social and industrial heritage. The harbour’s 19th-century warehouses now contain restaurants, shops and cultural institutions such as contemporary art gallery The Arnolfini.

Bristol was known as a significant port as far back as the 11th century. Bristol was a starting place for early voyages of exploration to the New World. On a ship out of Bristol in 1497 John Cabot, a Venetian, became the first European since the Vikings to land on mainland North America. In 1499 William Weston, a Bristol merchant, was the first Englishman to lead an exploration to North America.

Bristol’s history is inextricably linked with the slave trade and much of its wealth in the past was produced through the exploitation of slaves during the 18th and 19th centuries.  At the height of the Bristol slave trade, from 1700 to 1807, more than 2,000 slave ships carried an estimated 500,000 people from Africa to slavery in the Americas.

The statue of Edward Colston, the 17th century slave trader, was pulled down and rolled into Bristol harbour during a Black Lives Matter protest on 7th June 2020.

For more information on protected species, please visit the following pages: